How audiobooks are recorded
How audiobooks are recorded
How audiobooks are recorded
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How audiobooks are recorded - Vox

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Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com. For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To write us: joe@vox.com. To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

Video Related How audiobooks are recorded - Vox

Why so many sitcoms look the same

The one about sitcom lighting. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the surprising history behind sitcom lighting. Karl Freund was the genius cinematographer behind Metropolis, the silent film classic. But then he designed the set for I Love Lucy - the first of the multicam, laugh-track heavy sitcoms. Today, they look bland, but it wasn’t always that way. But at the time, Freund had a good reason to tackle the challenge. These lighting techniques are still in use today on sitcoms like Friends, the Big Bang Theory, and other multi-camera hits. What looks generic to our...

Why the triple axel is such a big deal

Triple axels can turn skaters into legends. This is why. Watch the rest of Skate Week, and our other sports explainers, here: http://bit.ly/2FfxM17 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Note: The video states Mirai Nagasu was the second American to land a triple axel in competition (this was recorded before her Olympic success). In 2005, American Kimmy Miessner completed a triple axel in national competition, though not world competition. You can read about it here: http://www.espn.com/olympics/news/story?id=1967992 Want to see Tonya' Harding's routine? You can find one version here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdC5G7CDvbI In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the triple axel and why it's such a big...

The dollhouses of death that changed forensic science

Frances Glessner Lee created dollhouses with dead dolls. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox's Phil Edwards explains why. Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Frances Glessner Lee's "Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death" are part of a new exhibit at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Art museum. The collection is part art, part science, and part creepy peek into the world of forensic science. These miniatures significantly advanced forensics and forensic science, but they aren't just CSI curios - they're complex, confounding works of art that manage to be morbid and beautiful at the same time. Lee's legacy bridges both the...

The Slightly Spooky Recamán Sequence - Numberphile

Check out Brilliant (and get 20% off their premium service): https://brilliant.org/numberphile (sponsor)... More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Check out Brilliant's Problem of the Week (it's free): https://brilliant.org/NumberphilePOTW/ Alex Bellos: http://www.alexbellos.com/ The coloring book featuring the Recamán Sequence: https://amzn.to/2t7CWE5 More videos with Alex: http://bit.ly/Bellos_Playlist The Recamán Sequence on the OEIS: https://oeis.org/A005132 Full length video of Tiffany Arment coloring the patern: https://youtu.be/4TK_raXODbo Tiffany Arment: https://twitter.com/tiffanyarment Thanks also to Edmund Harriss. Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/numberphile Numberphile is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI): http://bit.ly/MSRINumberphile We are also supported by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science. https://www.simonsfoundation.org/outreach/science-sandbox/ And support from Math For America -...

The hidden oil patterns on bowling lanes

Every bowling lane has a hidden oil pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards finds out what that means. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Every lane has a pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores how they change the game. Bowling isn’t just about a great ball and good form — if you want to understand the sport, you have to understand the lane. Every bowling lane, including the one in your neighborhood alley, is coated with an oil pattern to protect the wood. But these patterns aren’t just for protection —...

Why ships used this camouflage in World War I

Dazzle camouflage was fantastically weird. It was also surprisingly smart. WWII saw another kind of strange history unfold: a meme (yes, really). Watch our video on it here: http://bit.ly/2Co9DEu Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Dazzle camouflage was a surprisingly effective defense against torpedoes. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explains why. World War I ships faced a unique problem. The u-boat was a new threat at the time, and its torpedoes were deadly. That led artist Norman Wilkinson to come up with dazzle camouflage (sometimes called “razzle dazzle camouflage”). The idea was to confuse u-boats about a ship’s course, rather than try...

What is the best diet for humans? | Eran Segal | TEDxRuppin

Prof. Eran Segal presented conclusions from the research on the TEDxRuppin stage and made us question common dietary beliefs. For additional information see http://genie.weizmann.ac.il New research led by Prof. Eran Segals and Dr. Elinavs research unit indicates a drastic change in blood sugar levels between two individuals on identical diets - this may explain why some struggle to lose weight while others, on the same diet, stay lean and fit. The scientists even developed an algorithm that can calculate ones blood level based on his or her biology and lifestyle. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference...

This is Cuba's Netflix, Hulu, and Spotify – all without the internet

Media smugglers get Taylor Swift, Game of Thrones, and the New York Times to Cubans every week through an illegal network of runners. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In Cuba there is barely any internet. Anything but the state-run TV channels is prohibited. Publications are limited to the state-approved newspapers and magazines. This is the law. But, in typical Cuban fashion, the law doesn't stop a vast underground system of entertainment and news media distributors and consumers. "El Paquete Semanal" (The Weekly Package) is a weekly trove of digital content—everything from American movies to PDFs of Spanish newspapers—that is gathered, organized and...

Why all world maps are wrong

Making accurate world maps is mathematically impossible. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Interact with projections: http://metrocosm.com/compare-map-projections.html Mercator tool: http://thetruesize.com/ Mike Bostock Map Transitions: http://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/3711652 Mercator Puzzle: http://hive.sewanee.edu/ldale/maps/10/06-LOCAL.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Top 10 Biggest Design Errors Engineers & Architects Made

Designing things is hard. You must go to school for years doing un-fun things like math and physics to become qualified to build most things professionally. And because humans are humans and not calculators, mistakes are bound to occur. In this video I’ll show you 10 bizarre and noteworthy examples of these human errors. Subscribe for more! ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedSubscribe ◄ Stay updated ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedFacebook https://twitter.com/BeAmazedVideos https://instagram.com/BeAmazedVideos◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: beamazedvideos@gmail.com Credit: https://pastebin.com/xwiD5BDP

The surprising pattern behind color names around the world

Why so many languages invented words for colors in the same order. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In 1969, two Berkeley researchers, Paul Kay and Brent Berlin, published a book on a pretty groundbreaking idea: that every culture in history, when they developed their languages, invented words for colors in the exact same order. They claimed to know this based off of a simple color identification test, where 20 respondents identified 330 colored chips by name. If a language had six words, they were always black, white, red, green, yellow, and blue. If it had four terms, they were always black, white,...

Behind the Mic With Your Favorite Cartoon Voiceover Artists

Meet the voice actors who made after-school afternoons and Saturday mornings so much fun. SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/vR6Acb This story is a part of our Human Condition series. Come along and let us connect you to some of the most peculiar, stirring, extraordinary, and distinctive people in the world. Got a story idea for us? Shoot us an email at hey [at] GreatBigStory [dot] com Follow us behind the scenes on Instagram: http://goo.gl/2KABeX Make our acquaintance on Facebook: http://goo.gl/Vn0XIZ Give us a shout on Twitter: http://goo.gl/sY1GLY Come hang with us on Vimeo: http://goo.gl/T0OzjV Visit our world directly: http://www.greatbigstory.com

Why knights fought snails in medieval art

Look in the margins of medieval books and you'll find an unusual theme: knights vs. snails. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Lillian Randall's paper is here: https://www.scribd.com/document/263159779/The-Snail-in-Gothic-Marginal-Warfare And Michael Camille's book about marginal art can be found here: http://www.reaktionbooks.co.uk/display.asp?K=9780948462283 http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/I/bo3536323.html Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Medieval snails and knights — who knew? It turns out that medieval illuminated manuscripts featured a lot of bizarre imagery in the margins, but this pocket of art history might be one of the most intriguing. Scholar Lilian Randall provides the best theory for the unusual motif: these medieval knights fought snails in the margins because...

How a dictionary writer defines English

Kory Stamper works for Merriam-Webster. So how does a dictionary writer define the language? Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ You can find Kory's new book here: http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/530504/word-by-word-by-kory-stamper/?ref=PRHE46144D4DF00&aid=randohouseinc20897-20&linkid=PRHE46144D4DF00 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Dictionaries don't just appear. People have to write them. At Merriam-Webster, one of those people is Kory Stamper. The history of dictionaries involves a lot more than just looking at words. Lexicographers have to pore through hundreds of years of documents to understand where English has been and is going. Defining English, both for vocabulary and grammar, is a daunting task that Stamper tackles every day. It...

Why America still uses Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit, explained to the rest of the world Since I've moved to the US in 2010, there's one thing that I still don't fully understand: the imperial system. Virtually every country on earth uses Celsius but America has yet to follow. Although it might not seem like a big deal, not using the metric system puts America at a great disadvantage. For example, American kids have to learn 2 sets of measurements making science education even more difficult. On top of that, American companies have to produce extra products to export to metric countries. So why does the United States still...

Harry Potter and the translator's nightmare - Vox

Accio Harry Potter translations! Translating the Harry Potter books written by J.K. Rowling, in over 60 languages around the world, was not for the faint of heart or vocabulary. Translators didn't have advanced copies of the books to get a headstart and these books could take months to adapt from English. They also had to be clever in their solutions because the books are filled with wordplays, invented words, puns, British culture references, riddles, and more. The longest book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, at 870 pages was published June 21, 2003. The first translation of it was...

The big fight over Coexist

The Coexist logo is famous on bumper stickers and around the world — but it's also at the center of quite a few battles. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ ...Read the full article here: http://www.vox.com/2016/6/8/11867438/coexist-logo-bumper-sticker Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When Piotr Mlodozeniec designed the first Coexist logo, he had no idea how quickly — and how far — it would spread. His design for Museum on the Seam became iconic, and it was also closely copied by a designer t-shirt company, worn by U2s Bono on stage, and aped by hippie bumper sticker makers —...

Why Japan has so many vending machines

What vending machines can teach you about this country Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email Follow Johnny for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe. Facebook: https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO While in Japan I noticed vending machines everywhere. Looking into it a little deeper a discovered that there's a very interesting answer to why Japan has so many vending machines. It's an economic story but it's also a story about how Japanese society values robotics and automation. I even found a business card vending machine: https://youtu.be/Ogb7FyzQhbk Vox Borders is a new international series focused...

Yes, race walking is an Olympic sport. Here’s how it works.

Race walking is an incredible sport — it's time you understood it. Vox's Brian Resnick and Phil Edwards looked into race walking rules, race walking technique, and race walking form, and it turns out to be a fascinating Olympic sport. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox...

25 STRONGEST Materials Known to Man

Diamonds are the strongest materials known to man, right? You might be surprised to find out they are not. In fact, you may be surprised to discover some of the items considered as some of the toughest items man has ever known. Check out these 25 strongest materials known to man. We are always looking for the strongest materials. It allows us to create things that can withstand more abuse. Things like taller buildings, stronger cars, and protection for law enforcement. But contrary to what you might think, these stronger items are not bigger or heavier. Often, they are smaller...

How cars went from boxy to curvy

The big shift from boxy cars in the '80s to curvy cars in the '90s, explained. Read more: http://www.vox.com/2015/6/11/8762373/car-design-curves Magazine archive from: http://oldcarbrochures.org/ Automotive Hall of Fame footage from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaOP6dZkFf4 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The World War II meme that circled the world

Kilroy was here — those three words showed up in a lot of surprising places. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ We know about the epic drama of World War II, but what about the jokes? The above video tells the story (as best as we can). The iconic piece of graffiti that was known, in America, as "Kilroy Was Here" traveled the world in a fashion remarkably similar to a modern meme. Read some more background here: http://www.vox.com/2015/12/11/9886246/kilroy-was-here Sounds via RiverNile7, Daemeon1427, and JasonElrod, found at Freesound.org. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you...

We’ve hit peak lens flare. Here’s how it started.

We've reached peak lens flare. Vox's Phil Edwards explains how it happened. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Lens flare: it's familiar from the very shiny work of J.J. Abrams, but it goes far beyond his flare-strewn canon. Lens flare has a long history and a lot of different meanings. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video...

Proxemics: the study of personal space

Where did our idea of personal space bubbles come from? Proxemics is the answer — and it studies all the aspects of personal space. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Find a link to Hall's paper and more here: http://www.vox.com/2016/7/5/12082658/proxemics-study-personal-space-bubble Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The science is in: Exercise isn’t the best way to lose weight

Why working out is great for health, but not for weight loss, explained in five minutes. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o