Is It Dangerous To Talk To A Camera While Driving?
Is It Dangerous To Talk To A Camera While Driving?
Is It Dangerous To Talk To A Camera While Driving?

Is It Dangerous To Talk To A Camera While Driving? - Tom Scott

Tom Scott
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Hi, I'm Tom Scott. These are some of the things I've made and done. They'll probably come back to haunt me in a few years' time. (Want to get in touch about anything? Use the "contact me" link below, not YouTube messages!)

Video Related Is It Dangerous To Talk To A Camera While Driving? - Tom Scott

Why you shouldn't drive slowly in the left lane

Can we all agree that the left lane is for passing, please? Read more here: Subscribe to our channel! is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:

How Green Screen Worked Before Computers - - For those of us who grew up in the age of CGI, green screen is just "a thing that computers do". But how did effects like this work before the age of pixels? With the help of some suitably shiny graphics, here's a quick summary. Thank you to Matt Gray - - - for sterling work getting the camera and lighting right!

Welcome to Life: the singularity, ruined by lawyers - Or: what you see when you die. If you liked this, you may also enjoy two novels that provided inspiration for it: Jim Munroe's Everyone in Silico, where I first found the idea of a corporate-sponsored afterlife; and Rudy Rucker's trippy Postsingular, which introduced me to the horrifying idea of consciousness slums.

The Little-Known Patterns on British Streets

I thought about saying "secret patterns" or "mysterious patterns" in the title, but that'd be a lie: they're just mostly unknown! So let's talk about tactile paving, about design, about accessibility, and about those bumpy bits that you stand on when you're crossing a British street. // Thanks to Richard Holmes and the team from the RNIB! They're at, on YouTube at and on Twitter at ! The design manual is called Guidance on the Use of Tactile Paving Surfaces (Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, 1998) [PDF]: Editor: Michelle Martin (@mrsmmartin) DoP / camera operator: Tomek...

Why Snow and Confetti Ruin YouTube Video Quality

Your sports team wins. The confetti drops. And suddenly, the video quality falls apart. Why? Let's talk about interframe compression, bitrate, and unnecessary green screen effects. I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Instagram as @tomscottgo You might also like: How Green Screen Worked Before Computers: This uses one Creative Commons by-attribution photo, "Sony Trinitron" by Antífama, available here:

The SPF Rating On Sunscreen Is Questionable At Best - @tomscott - SPF is meant to be a multiplier, but it's much more complicated than that. And as a Brit in Florida, I have to take care about burning.


TechZone ► If there's a river or a lake near your house, then you probably know that certain places aren't suitable for you to swim. Well, for example, if there are some hidden rocks or, according to some legend, a terrible monster. But there are places where not only you're not supposed to swim, but you shouldn't even put your hands or feet in. We don't simply want to scare you, so you're gonna see it for yourself. These are the places where you shouldn't to swim.

Fantastic Features We Don't Have In The English Language - @tomscott - There are lots of interesting features in other languages, some of which English would really benefit from having. I'm going to talk about four of them: time-independence, clusivity, absolute direction, and evidentiality. Also, I've learned from last week: no irritating piano music this time! UNESCO list of endangered languages:

Why California's Musical Road Sounds Terrible

In Lancaster, California, there's a musical road. When you drive over it, it plays the William Tell Overture. Unfortunately, it's out of tune. Here's why. Thanks to David Simmons-Duffin, who figured this out about nine years ago: -- he seems to be the first to have figured out not just that it's wrong, but exactly what happened! I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

Ten Illegal Things To Do In London

A quick and dirty video from Tom ( - @tomscott) and Matt ( - @unnamedculprit) - ten illegal things to do in London. Yes, these are all properly illegal: you can see our references at

The Museum of Failure

In Helsingborg, Sweden, the Museum of Failure has just opened. It's just one room, but inside, curator Samuel West has assembled some of the world's greatest commercial disasters - and also a few things that just didn't work out the way anyone planned. More about them: Edited by: Michelle Martin, @mrsmmartin I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

I Can't Show You How Pink This Pink Is

I can show a brighter pink. I can show a more saturated pink. But I can't show you this pink. Not quite. More about Stuart Semple and his pigments: [that's his store, we overloaded Stuart's personal web site,, within a few minutes...!] (I reached out to Anish Kapoor's studio twice for comment; I didn't get any response.) Edited by Michelle Martin (@mrsmmartin) I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

Why Hold Music Sounds Worse Now

It's not your imagination; hold music on phones really did sound better in the old days. Here's why, as we talk about old telephone exchanges and audio compression. Thanks to the Milton Keynes Museum, and their Connected Earth gallery: - they're also on Twitter as @mkmuseum, and on Facebook: I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

Will YouTube Ever Run Out Of Video IDs?

In the URL of each YouTube video is the 11-character video ID, unique for each video. Can they ever run out? Just how many videos can YouTube handle? To work it out, we need to talk about counting systems, and about something called Base 64. Want to know how the single camera shot was done? "Matt Bought a DJI Osmo and It's Surprisingly Good" is today's video over on the Park Bench: I'm at or on Twitter at or on Facebook at or on Instagram as tomscottgo. Filmed by Matt Gray, who's at or @unnamedculprit on basically everything everywhere.

Arson as a Christmas Tradition: The Gävle Goat

In Gävle, Sweden, every year they build Gävlebocken, an enormous traditional Swedish Christmas straw goat. And every year, someone tries to burn it down. Here's to holiday traditions. THANKS TO: Axel Wickman, @axelwickm on Twitter, for the post-burning photos of the goat from this morning! I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Instagram and Snapchat as tomscottgo

This Video Is 2D And 3D Simultaneously: the Pulfrich Effect

Hold on tight, because with a stabilised camera shot and a pair of sunglasses, you're about to see a video that works in both 2D and 3D at the same time. The technique's called the Pulfrich Effect, and this is how it works. The BBC's terrible 90s Doctor Who special, Dimensions in Time, can be seen here, complete with its Noel Edmonds-filled framing: Camera and sound: Matt Gray / I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

Why the rise of the robots won’t mean the end of work

For now, at least, we have better things to worry about. Subscribe to our channel! Sources: Clips: /// Recent advancements in artificial intelligence and robotics have commentators worrying about the coming obsolescence of the human worker. Some in Silicon Valley are even calling for a basic minimum income provided by the government for everyone, under the assumption that work will become scarce. But many economists are skeptical of these claims, because the notion that the the economy offers a fixed amount of work has been debunked time and time again over the centuries and current economic data show no signs of a productivity...

The World's Most Powerful Tidal Current: the Saltstraumen Maelstrom

Near Bodø in Norway, there's the strongest tidal current in the world: Saltstraumen Maelstrom, a constantly-changing rush of whirlpools, boils and vortices. It might not be quite the whirlpools of myth and legend, but it's still an impressive sight to see. I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

Why The Prime Meridian Isn't At 0º - - If you travel to Greenwich, stand on the famous Prime Meridian Line -- which is marked with a physical line and a sculpture at the Royal Observatory -- and look at your GPS, it won't read 0° longitude. It'll be slightly out. Who's right? And why? Many thanks to my lovely cameraman Tom Morris (, who dealt with the cold wind admirably!

Inside The Giant American Freezer Filled With Polar Ice

Welcome to the US National Ice Core Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, where there's a giant freezer filled with 20km of ice cores from Greenland and the Antarctic. Here's why. Thanks to everyone at the US National Ice Core Laboratory! You can find out more about them here: The Ice Core Laboratory is supported by the National Science Foundation: Edited by Michelle Martin, @mrsmmartin I'm at on Twitter at on Facebook at and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo

Why The YouTube Algorithm Will Always Be A Mystery

The mysterious YouTube algorithm. It's confused people for years, and will continue to do so. So why isn't YouTube more transparent? It used to be that they wouldn't tell anyone how it works - but now, it's that they can't. Let's talk about deep learning algorithms, neural networks, and search engine optimisation. CREDITS: Thanks to animator Matt Ley for the wonderful cartoon of me: I put this together in three days, plus a day of checking and proofing, in Adobe After Effects. It took about eight hours to render, but that's because every frame has keying, lighting, camera, and motion blur effects,...

58 and other Confusing Numbers - Numberphile

Squarespace: More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ More linguistics on Numberphile: Billion and Trillion: Tom Scott on numbers and linguistics - a discussion with spans counties, countries, continents and the far reaches of space. Tom's own channel is: Art and animation by Pete McPartlan Support us on Patreon: NUMBERPHILE Website: Numberphile on Facebook: Numberphile tweets: Subscribe: Numberphile is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI): Videos by Brady Haran Brady's videos subreddit: Brady's latest videos across all channels: Sign up for (occasional) emails: Numberphile T-Shirts: Other merchandise:

Top 10 Secrets The Food Industry Doesn't Want You To Know

From marketing tricks to shady practices, the food industry has a lot of secrets. Here are some crucial facts you should know about the food you eat. Subscribe for more! ► ◄ Stay updated ► ◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: Be Amazed at these Top 10 Secrets The Food Industry Doesn't Want You To Know! A LOT of Antibiotics Go Into Meat - Did you know that 80% of the antibiotics produced in the world are fed to animals? Most of them don’t actually go to human beings! That’s what...

Why The Government Shouldn't Break WhatsApp

Encryption backdoors - breaking WhatsApp and iMessage's security to let the government stop Bad Things - sounds like a reasonable idea. Here's why it isn't. A transcript of this video's available here: CREDITS: Filmed at the Cambridge Centre for Computing History: Camera by Tomek: Thanks to everyone who helped proofread my script! REFERENCES: WhatsApp's privacy protections questioned after terror attack: WhatsApp must be accessible to authorities, says Amber Rudd: UK government renews calls for WhatsApp backdoor after London attack: Investigatory Powers Act: India is 'ready to use' Blackberry message intercept system: Revealed: how US and UK spy agencies defeat internet privacy and security: Councils...