It's not you. Commuting is bad for your health.
It's not you. Commuting is bad for your health.
It's not you. Commuting is bad for your health.
Loading...

It's not you. Commuting is bad for your health. - Vox

Vox
Videos: 932
Subscriber: 5,243,762
Views: 1,167,950,641
If this video violated? Please submit request complaints or delete it right now..
Submit request or Delete this video

Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com. For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To write us: joe@vox.com. To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

Video Related It's not you. Commuting is bad for your health. - Vox

Loading...
Why Japan has so many vending machines

What vending machines can teach you about this country Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email Follow Johnny for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe. Facebook: https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO While in Japan I noticed vending machines everywhere. Looking into it a little deeper a discovered that there's a very interesting answer to why Japan has so many vending machines. It's an economic story but it's also a story about how Japanese society values robotics and automation. I even found a business card vending machine: https://youtu.be/Ogb7FyzQhbk Vox Borders is a new international series focused...

Open offices are overrated

If you work in an office, there's a good chance it's an open one. How did we get here? And why is it so bad? Find the Overrated Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/OverratedTheShow Find Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Open offices have been around a surprisingly long time. But they're relatively misunderstood for their role in workplace culture. Where did open offices and cubicles come from, and are they really what we want? This episode of Overrated explores the history, including Frank Lloyd Wright, Herman Miller, and other key figures in the office design movement. Our workplaces haven't always been this way...

The 'duck curve' is solar energy's greatest challenge

Renewables require change in the energy supply chain. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Electricity is incredibly difficult to store, so grid operators have to generate it at the exact moment it is demanded. In order to do this, they create incredibly accurate models of the total electric loads, that is how much energy will be consumed on a given day. But as utilities started to produce more energy from renewable sources like solar, the models started to shift as well. California researchers discovered a peculiarity in their state’s electric load curves, that started to look more and more like a duck. And that...

Man Quits $80K Job to Work in Grocery Store Part Time - Minimalism

Yves quit his job even though he had it all: a big salary, health benefits and a pension plan. He sold his downtown condo, too. Why did he decide to drastically simplify his life? Because he was unhappy and unfulfilled. A couple of years ago, he went on a 10-day silent retreat and, after much soul-searching, realized that his job and his stressful lifestyle needed to go. Now, a year and a half later, he's living a minimalist lifestyle in a small bachelor apartment, riding his bike to work, and working 3 days a week...

How audiobooks are recorded

An audiobook narrator explains her process – and reads our writing. Check out other Vox Almanac videos here: http://bit.ly/2DkcQou Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To investigate how audiobooks are made, we sat down with a professional audiobook narrator, Suzy Jackson, to break down her work. And to make the audiobook recording process even more apparent, Vox's Phil Edwards wrote one for her. According to Suzy Jackson, the hardest part of recording an audiobook isn't acting as different characters, it's the long hours. And random esophageal noises. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and...

Superblocks: How Barcelona is taking city streets back from cars

Modern cities are designed for cars. But the city of Barcelona is testing out an urban design trick that can give cities back to pedestrians. Read more: http://www.vox.com/2016/8/4/12342806/barcelona-superblocks Thumbnail image from http://shutterstock.com Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The better way to board an airplane

The way we board airplanes make no sense. Tests have shown that boarding the plane back-to-front is much slower than the alternatives. Check out our quick video to find out why. Subscribe to our channel! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=voxdotcom Simulations by Menkes van den Briel: https://www.youtube.com/user/menkes76/videos Footage by: germb747 https://www.youtube.com/user/germb747 1ExtraordinaryTravel https://www.youtube.com/user/1ExtraordinaryTravel/videos Em S https://www.youtube.com/user/moriseiki2006/videos Darck Age https://www.youtube.com/user/MrDarckage/videos methedras1 https://www.youtube.com/user/methedras1 --- Vox.com is news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: youtube.com/voxdotcom/videos Follow Vox on Twitter: https://twitter.com/voxdotcom Or on...

Why the ocean is getting louder

What the world sounds like underwater. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO We often think of the ocean as a quiet, peaceful place, filled with animals that don't make much noise. So when I went diving in the ocean for the first time, I was surprised at how rich the soundscape around me was: you could hear fish nibbling on coral and squid swimming past you. But more than anything, you could almost always hear the hum of a boat engine. It's part of a big problem in the ocean right now. Ship traffic noise has doubled every decade since the 1960s — and...

Why Do American Schools Have Such Long Hours?

The structure of America’s school calendar may seem counterintuitive—and in many ways, it is. In this episode of School Myths by The Atlantic, we investigate some pressing questions, such as why American students have long summer breaks between school years and yet such short gaps between each class.

The wall of eyes trained on the US - Mexico border

There's more to the border than just a wall. Follow Johnny on Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO and Facebook: https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email This dispatch is from the Rio Grande River, on the Texas side of the U.S. border with Mexico. I embedded with border patrol, to learn about the technology, techniques, and challenges of monitoring a section of the border with over 300 miles of river. Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. I've traveled to five of six border locations to produce a final...

How IKEA gets you to impulsively buy more

IKEA has mastered the “Gruen effect.” Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Researchers estimate that 50 percent of purchases are unplanned. These purchases, especially impulse buys, present an opportunity for retailers who can entice consumers to deviate from their shopping lists. One of the most effective ways to influence this is through a store’s architecture. In the 20th century, the architect Victor Gruen, who pioneered the first American shopping malls, used light and space to dramatically stage goods in storefront windows. His designs were meant to capture the attention of passersby — and convert them into customers. This conversion became known as the “Gruen...

How streets, roads, and avenues are different

There's a method to the madness of classifying roads. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ A street is a road but a road isn't always a street. A road can also be an avenue or a boulevard—it's the general term for anything that connects two points. From there, the names of roads can be shaped by their environment and/or the form of the road. A drive is a long winding road that can be shaped by mountains or a lake. Place is a narrow road with no throughway. And just as there is no rule book to...

Why Norway is full of Teslas

Oslo is the Tesla capital of the world. Follow Johnny on Facebook at https://goo.gl/l0x5cA for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe for Vox Borders. Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email I spent a day in Oslo before traveling to Svalbard, and noticed that there were Teslas everywhere. Upon further investigation, I learned that the Norwegian government heavily incentivizes ownership of electric cars: Tesla doesn't pay a sales tax on the models it sells, electric car owners are exempt from automobile tolls, and they can charge their vehicles for free. The catch is that Norway...

Why red light cameras are a scam

Redlight camera tickets aren’t just a nuisance to drivers, they also cost cities millions. Many drivers are familiar with receiving the dreaded automated traffic enforcement photo for running a red light. While red light cameras have been reported to reduce broadside crashes, it has been shown these cameras increase rear-end collisions as well. In addition, numerous tickets aren't going to people running straight through red lights, but drivers failing to make a complete stop while turning on red. Safety is touted as the biggest concern but there are better long term solutions than municipalities installing red light cameras. Building more roundabouts...

The business of GIFs: Then and now

We're in a GIF renaissance. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The GIF was invented in 1989. And since its beginning, the GIF has been used to make money. At first, GIFs were sold as placeholders for the web of the '90s and early 2000s. But after web design became informed by professional standards, gifs lost their role as placeholders. Eventually they became tools of expression, turning snippets of video from popular culture into bite size communication devices. Today, a few big tech companies are trying to capitalize on this new use of GIFs, partnering with brands who want their content to...

Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches

That bench won't be yours forever. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When designing urban spaces, city planners have many competing interests to balance. After all, cities are some of the most diverse places on the planet. They need to be built for a variety of needs. In recent years, these competing interests have surfaced conflict over an unlikely interest: purposefully uncomfortable benches. Enter the New York City MTA. They’ve installed 'leaning bars’ to supplement traditional benches & save platform space. But designs like this carry an often invisible cost: they rob citizens of hospitable public space. And the people who experience this cost...

How a mathematician dissects a coincidence

Can you unknot a twist of fate with logic? Vox's Phil Edwards asked mathematician Joseph Mazur about his book, Fluke, and one of its most incredible stories. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Find a link to the book and more information here: http://www.vox.com/2016/10/31/13457236/mathematician-joe-mazur-fluke-coincidence You can find more information and links to the book on Vox.com. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian...

Adam Savage Cooks the Impossible Burger with Traci Des Jardins!

Adam Savage visits chef Traci Des Jardins at her restaurant Jardinière to learn how the Impossible Burger is cooked. Traci walks us through the making of this veggie burger that looks, tastes, and feels like real meat, discussing the culinary science of how it cooks on the grill. Plus, a taste test! Shot by Gunther Kirsch and edited by Norman Chan Subscribe for more videos! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=testedcom Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/testedcom Get updates on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/testedcom Tested is: Adam Savage http://www.twitter.com/donttrythis Norman Chan http://www.twitter.com/nchan Simone Giertz http://www.twitter.com/simonegiertz Joey Fameli http://www.twitter.com/joeyfameli Kishore Hari http://www.twitter.com/sciencequiche Frank Ippolito http://www.twitter.com/frankippolito Sean Charlesworth http://www.twitter.com/cworthdynamics Jeremy Williams http://www.twitter.com/jerware Gunther Kirsch Ryan Kiser Thanks for watching!

Why your old phones collect in a junk drawer of sadness

Smartphones shouldn’t be so disposable. Could fixing the way we make our phones help solve climate change? This is the third episode of Climate Lab, a six-part series produced by the University of California in partnership with Vox. Hosted by Emmy-nominated conservation scientist Dr. M. Sanjayan, the videos explore the surprising elements of our lives that contribute to climate change andthe groundbreaking work being done to fight back. Featuring conversations with experts, scientists, thought leaders and activists, the series takes what can seem like an overwhelming problem and breaks it down into manageable parts: from clean energy to food waste, religion...

Japan's independent kids I The Feed

By Western standards, Japanese culture emphasises independence and self-reliance from an extraordinarily young age. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SBS2Australia Twitter: https://twitter.com/sbs2 Tumblr: http://sbs2australia.tumblr.com/

Can This Chef Make A 3-Course Meal In A Coffee Maker?

Alexis is challenged to make a delicious 3-course meal using only one tricky appliance. Follow Alexis on Instagram @alexisdeboschnek Check us out on Facebook! - facebook.com/buzzfeedtasty Credits: https://www.buzzfeed.com/bfmp/videos/68854

Why Perfect Grades Don't Matter

Research shows that chasing after perfect grades discourages creativity and reduces academic risk-taking. Here's why good grades don't always translate into success in life.

Are huskies Russian? Depends who you ask.

What I learned when I trained sled dogs for a day. Follow Johnny for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe for Vox Borders on Facebook at https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email I spoke with my friend Sasha, who works in Barentsburg training Arctic sled dog teams. Dog breeds like the Husky or Samoyed were traditionally bred in Siberia, but in the 1920s when international dog standards were developing, the Soviet Union was closed to the world. Because of this, these traditionally Russian breeds fell under the administration of the Nordic Dog...

The high cost of free parking

Hidden parking rules hurt our cities. Will Chilton and Paul Mackie of Mobility Lab explain. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The cities we live in are shaped by the way we get around them. Over the past 60 years, with more and more people opting to drive cars, the need for parking spaces has increased with the boom in driving. To accommodate that demand early on, cities and towns started requiring developers to include parking with their new buildings after World War II. These policies, known as mandatory parking minimums, set precise standards for parking spaces for each building. And these...

Chronesthesia

Watch Timeless Mondays 10/9c on NBC: https://youtu.be/C6AiokEd4NU Created in partnership with Timeless. "So, with a final blast of rhetorical trumpets, was interred the name and literary reputation of one of the pivotal figures in the history of American science fiction -- until now." -Sam Moskowitz on Edward Page Mitchell (1973) *** SOURCES AND LINKS *** The Crystal Man: Stories By Edward Page Mitchell (Sam Moskowitz) https://goo.gl/xE6x3W Time Traveling NOVA https://goo.gl/Bgbe4N Edward Page Mitchell https://goo.gl/ewHhq1 https://goo.gl/DHqUCK Mental Time Travel https://goo.gl/v5oAsC What Makes Mental Time Travel Possible https://goo.gl/PevCSN 1916 New York Times https://goo.gl/7AcJvu Memoirs Of The Twentieth Century https://goo.gl/Gam8wG Interview With Dr. Endel Tulbing by Veebiakadeemia https://goo.gl/L98CiJ https://goo.gl/u6W2Bl Sam Moskowitz https://goo.gl/LuPYTM Time Before Clocks https://goo.gl/X1rPWu https://goo.gl/78rkYZ Endel Tulving https://goo.gl/XC2wRe Water Clocks https://goo.gl/1MeCSq Time Division https://goo.gl/CX0ATU A Brief History Of Time Measurement https://goo.gl/FH4j7F Why Don’t Older Americans...