Why danger symbols can’t last forever
Why danger symbols can’t last forever
Why danger symbols can’t last forever
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Why danger symbols can’t last forever - Vox

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Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com. For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To write us: joe@vox.com. To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

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The rise and fall of the American fallout shelter

Whatever happened to fallout shelters? And would they have actually worked? Watch Duck and Cover with us: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUcQ7hESI-M Phil Edwards on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox's Phil Edwards looks at the history behind one of the Cold War's more unusual legacies — the fallout shelter. Of course, any history of the fallout shelter has to include nuclear proliferation, civil defense, Presidential politics, and a turtle named Bert. The video above serves as a condensed history of the Cold War’s fallout shelter fad, from the kookily cheerful propaganda videos to the hobbled Federal agencies that tried to administer Civil Defense. Yes,...

The Doomsday Clock, explained

The clock's ticking. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The Doomsday Clock began as a graphic on the first edition of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ magazine. Since then, the Bulletin has used the clock as a symbol for their interpretation of humanity’s approach toward the end of times, changing the time as new threats arise or old threats resolve. Originally, the Bulletin only changed the time when they felt the threat of nuclear weapons became more or less imminent, but the clock today reflects other types of threats as well, from climate change to cybersecurity to reckless language to Donald Trump. Here’s...

The 116 images NASA wants aliens to see

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It's not you. Bad doors are everywhere.

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Can You Melt Obsidian and Cast a Sword?

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How you could get away with murder in Yellowstone’s “Zone of Death"

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The Animals of Chernobyl | The New York Times

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The surprising pattern behind color names around the world

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The tiny island in New York City that nobody is allowed to visit

There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New...

NASA's plan to save Earth from a giant asteroid

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The myth of the "supermale" and the extra Y chromosome

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The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.

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Meet the designer cats with wild blood

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7 ways a trip to Mars could kill you

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The hidden war over grocery shelf space

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The dollhouses of death that changed forensic science

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