Why every American graduation plays the same song
Why every American graduation plays the same song
Why every American graduation plays the same song
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Why every American graduation plays the same song - Vox

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Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com. For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To write us: joe@vox.com. To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

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This plane could cross the Atlantic in 3.5 hours. Why did it fail?

The Concorde gave us supersonic transport. But why did this supersonic plane fail? The answer is complicated. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why all world maps are wrong

Making accurate world maps is mathematically impossible. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Interact with projections: http://metrocosm.com/compare-map-projections.html Mercator tool: http://thetruesize.com/ Mike Bostock Map Transitions: http://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/3711652 Mercator Puzzle: http://hive.sewanee.edu/ldale/maps/10/06-LOCAL.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Would you use time travel to kill baby Hitler?

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A Game You Can Always Win

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Why America still uses Fahrenheit

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The surprising pattern behind color names around the world

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The hidden oil patterns on bowling lanes

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The R-rated Oregon Trail

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Why babies in medieval paintings look like ugly old men

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How America became a superpower

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Bernie Sanders' accent, explained

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Why the triple axel is such a big deal

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The Slightly Spooky Recamán Sequence - Numberphile

Check out Brilliant (and get 20% off their premium service): https://brilliant.org/numberphile (sponsor)... More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Check out Brilliant's Problem of the Week (it's free): https://brilliant.org/NumberphilePOTW/ Alex Bellos: http://www.alexbellos.com/ The coloring book featuring the Recamán Sequence: https://amzn.to/2t7CWE5 More videos with Alex: http://bit.ly/Bellos_Playlist The Recamán Sequence on the OEIS: https://oeis.org/A005132 Full length video of Tiffany Arment coloring the patern: https://youtu.be/4TK_raXODbo Tiffany Arment: https://twitter.com/tiffanyarment Thanks also to Edmund Harriss. Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/numberphile Numberphile is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI): http://bit.ly/MSRINumberphile We are also supported by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science. https://www.simonsfoundation.org/outreach/science-sandbox/ And support from Math For America -...

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The rise and fall of the American fallout shelter

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